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Law and International affairs scholar Beth Farmer authors new chapter on Chinese Antitrust law

A new book on Chinese Antitrust Law opens with a chapter by Beth Farmer, who is the McQuaide Blasko Faculty Scholar and professor of law and international affairs. The Chinese Anti-Monopoly Law: New Developments and Empirical Evidence (Edward Elgar Publishing 2013) uses case studies to evaluate experiences China’s Anti-Monopoly Law, passed in 2007.

A new book on Chinese Antitrust Law opens with a chapter by Beth Farmer, who is the McQuaide Blasko Faculty Scholar and professor of law and international affairs. The Chinese Anti-Monopoly Law: New Developments and Empirical Evidence (Edward Elgar Publishing 2013) uses case studies to evaluate experiences China’s Anti-Monopoly Law, passed in 2007.

Antitrust law is the study of market regulation in a way that prevents monopolies and encourages fairness.

“So much of global business now flows through or is connected to PRC. Attorneys around the globe need to understand the legal restrictions that are now in play in one of the world’s largest economies,” said Professor Farmer. Farmer is a scholar of U.S. and foreign antitrust and trade regulation law, issues of federalism, and comparative competition policy. Her interests include U.S. and foreign antitrust and trade regulation law, issues of federalism, and comparative competition policy. She teaches classes in comparative antitrust law, criminal law, international law, and international criminal law to JD and SIA students.

The book is broken into four parts: Recent Developments in the Anti-Monopoly Law, Anti-Monopoly Law: Practice and Cases, European Perspectives on the Anti-Monopoly Law, and Conclusions: Future Look. Professor Farmer’s chapter focuses on developments in regulation and competition policy in China and trends in private civil litigation. New York University law professor Eleanor Fox said the book is an “excellent collection of papers” and “an invaluable guide to an understanding of the dynamic and possibilities of the Chinese law.”

During Professor Farmer’s sabbatical next year, she will be researching comparative antitrust focused on regional networks and liberalization of state owned enterprises for one semester and international criminal law issues, hopefully based in The Hague for another semester.

Professor Farmer is on the advisory board of the American Antitrust Institute, the board of the Center for State Enforcement of Antitrust and Consumer Protection Law, and on several committees of the ABA Antitrust and International Law Sections.

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