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Curriculum

The curriculum for the LL.M. consists of required and elective courses which will be taken in the fall semester at Radboud and a thesis which will be written in the spring semester at Penn State Law. Students typically choose elective courses upon arrival at Radboud. All courses in the Radboud LLM program are taught in English. There are no enrollment restrictions.

A description of each course is available on Radboud’s website. The courses listed below reflect the curriculum for the calendar year 2012/2013.

A normal course load for exchange students is four to five courses; Penn state recommends taking four courses (see below for details).
 

Fall Semester

During the fall semester, students will start off by taking one required intensive introductory course at the beginning of the semester, and then take the rest of the courses for the remainder of the semester. Among those courses, there are two other required general EU courses as. In addition to these courses, students select one to two courses from one of three optional areas of specialization.

Required Courses

During the fall semester, students will take three intensive compulsory courses in EU law:

  1. Advanced Notions of EU Law (7 EC)
    The first course is an intensive introductory course in EU law called “Advanced Notions of EU Law”) which will be taken upfront as a crash course. No prior knowledge of EU law is required to take this course. The course will provide an overview of the law of the EU and its institutions as well as case law of the courts of the European Union, the Court of Justice of the European Union and the General Court. Provisions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the functioning of the European Union and the measures of secondary legislation adopted by the European Union (regulations, directives, decisions) will also be discussed.
  2. EU External Relations Law (7 EC)
    This compulsory course focuses on the external dimension of EU law: the rules that govern the Union's international relations as well as the so-called Common Foreign and Security Policy. Among the course topics will be inter alia: the external competences and international legal personality of the EU; the role of the institutions, the effect of legal measures and the methods of decision-making; judicial review on external action; the European security and defense policy; EU trade relations with third countries and its activities under international economic law (WTO/GATT).
  3. European Competition Law (7 EC)
    This course will focus on the competition rules addressed to undertakings (Article 101 TFEU, Article 102 TFEU, Regulation 139/2004) as well as on procedure, as laid down in Regulation 1/2003. This allows students to deal with both the centralized application by the European Commission and the decentralized application of the Treaty rules by national courts and national competition authorities.

Electives

After completing the intensive crash course on “Advanced Notions of EU Law” students take one to two courses from one of three tracks for the remainder of the fall semester, in addition to “EU External Relations Law” and “EU Competition Law”.

Advanced European Law
   

This track offers a generalist approach with an emphasis on the concepts of European Union law. It gives students the opportunity to acquire an advanced understanding of the core issues of EU law. By participating in the European Law Moot Court students can practice their legal skills at a high level.

Students are required to take one of the following three courses:

  • European Law Moot Court Competition (7 EC)
  • European Internal Market Law (7 EC)
  • Judicial Protection in the EU (7 EC).

In addition, up to two courses of the following optional courses may be selected:

  • European Legal History (7EC)
  • Intellectual Property: Copyright Law (7 EC)
  • International/European Tax Law (7 EC)
  • European Employment Law (7 EC)
  • Comparative Constitutional Law (7 EC)
  • Philosophy of Law (7 EC)
  • Sociology of Law (7 EC).
Human Rights and Migration Law
 

Within this track, Radboud combines human rights and immigration law courses, two areas that are among the most important in the European Union today. LL.M. students benefit from the outstanding knowledge and experience of the Centre for Migration Law.

Students are required to take one of the following three courses:

  • European Immigration Law (7 EC)
  • Protection of Human Rights (Advanced) (7 EC)
  • European and Comparative Refugee Law (7 EC).

In addition, up to two courses of the following optional courses may be selected:

  • European Legal History (7 EC)
  • International Individual Criminal Responsibility (7 EC)
  • Comparative Constitutional Law (7 EC)
  • Philosophy of Law (7 EC)
  • Public International Law Advanced (7 EC)
  • Judicial Protection in the EU (7 EC)
  • European Fundamental Rights and Freedoms (7 EC)
  • Sociology of Law (7 EC).
European Business Law
 

This track offers students the chance to become proficient in the area of European business law. Radboud’s “Business and Law Research Centre” combines academic excellence with the practical expertise of major companies and law firms.

Students are required to take one of the following three courses:

  • Finance and Insolvency Law (7 EC)
  • European and Comparative Company Law (7 EC)
  • European Private Law (7 EC).

Under the program, up to two courses of the following optional courses may be selected:
Intellectual Property:

  • Copyright Law (7 EC)
  • Private International Law (7 EC)
  • European Internal Market (7 EC)
  • International/European Tax Law (7 EC)
  • Sociology of Law (7 EC).


Spring Semester: Master's Thesis

The thesis will be completed during the spring semester of the 3L year which will be spent at Penn State. During the fall semester at Radboud, the LL.M. student will select a topic for a thesis and a professor as a supervisor. Student will also discuss the timeframe in which the thesis will be finished and set a graduation date. Under normal circumstances, students will be expected to complete the thesis prior to the end of classes (in April) of the final semester of the 3L year.

Thesis and graduation procedure: The thesis is expected to be approximately 40 – 50 pages and is worth 18 EC. Students typically need three months to complete the thesis. There will also be a 30-45 minute long oral exam about the thesis conducted via skype.

For Radboud, completion in mid-June will allow for a graduation in July, or mid-July for a graduation at the end of August. If the thesis is completed later than that, tuition fees for the following year will accrue. These will not be paid by Penn State.

It is recommended that students seek a Penn State law professor to co-supervise the thesis as independent study project during the fall semester at Radboud. Students will be able to register for 2 Penn State Law credits of independent study for the spring semester. In this case, the thesis must be completed at the end of the spring semester at Penn State Law.